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Culloden Cancer Survivor Travels to D.C., Asks for Increased Cancer Research Funding

Angela Stanley (left), meets with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, to discuss the need to support an increase in federal funding for cancer research through the National Institutes of Health.

Angela Stanley, a cancer breast survivor from Culloden, was among more than 700 cancer patients, survivors, and their loved ones from all 50 states, Guam and Puerto Rico, and almost every congressional district, to unite in Washington, D.C. on September 19th, as part of the annual American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) Leadership Summit and Lobby Day. As Congress works to identify 2024 priorities ahead of the September 30 budget deadline. ACS CAN volunteers urged elected officials to take specific steps to make cancer a national priority and help end a disease that still kills roughly 1,670 people a day in this country.

Stanley met with Sen. Capito and staff from Sen. Manchin and Rep. Miller’s offices to discuss the need to support an increase in federal funding for cancer research through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She asked them to support a bill to waive out-of-pocket costs for individuals with the highest risk of prostate cancer, including Black men and those with a family history of the disease. Additionally, she asked Members to support legislation to create a pathway for Medicare to cover new multi-cancer early detection tests once they are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and proven effective.

“Roughly one in three Americans will hear the words ‘you have cancer’ in their lifetime. We need a full and unwavering commitment from Congress to take action to help prevent, detect and treat cancer,” said Stanley. “We want our lawmakers to know that volunteers from West Virginia and every state across the country are counting on them to take a stand.”

After meeting with lawmakers, volunteers gathered at the Constitution Gardens in Washington, D.C., to honor cancer survivors and remember those who have been lost to the disease during the annual Lights of Hope ceremony. Illuminated bags decorated with the names of those who have faced a cancer diagnosis were displayed in a powerful message of hope.

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